Posted by
Oct 19, 2019

While the folks at Chase Bliss Audio were publicly working on two ambitious projects (the automatic-fader-driven Preamp MkII and the uber-documented looper Blooper) they were also secretly designing a new two-channel granular micro-looper called M O O D, which they unveiled today (06.20.2019) through a video of their favorite Toronto videographer Knobs.

The M O O D is a continuation of the series of collaborative designs the Minnesota-based company started releasing in 2018 (previous collaborations included products with circuits by Keeley and Benson); for this pedal, owner and chief designer Joel Korte reached out to the folks at Old Blood Noise, who took care of the suite of live spatial effects in the pedal’s Wet Channel, and also to Belgian designer David Rolo from Drolo FX, who designed the Loop Channel.

A stompbox that belongs squarely in the category of experimental devices for sound explorers, the M O O D is presented as a “study in interaction,” which:

is internally collaborative, allowing audio to freely pass back and forth between its two sides, evolving and transforming over time.

As for all Chase Bliss pedals, the amount of tweak offered is borderline infinite, but the main feature here is in the way the two channels are routed, which can happen in three different ways.

You can find out more about it in the videos below.

M O O D™ is a two channel granular micro-looper / delay. Designed to be playful and immediate, it is a study of interaction. M O O D™ is internally collaborative, allowing audio to freely pass back and forth between its two sides, evolving and transforming over time. Drolo FX is behind the loop channel, a collection of always-listening micro-loopers, and Old Blood Noise Endeavors offer us the wet channel, a suite of live spatial effects. We have three different options for how the channels are internally routed. Run a time-stretched loop through a cloud of delay taps, re-record it and carry on. Overdub, freeze, dissolve, smear. The device’s heart is the clock control, which slows or accelerates both sides simultaneously in harmonized steps. Instantly turn a loop into rolling chirps, or divide a reverb down into atmospheric noise. And naturally, we have full MIDI, dip-switch, and preset implementation.